Here Be Dragons!

Dragon Dreaming Magick

“If the sky could dream, it would dream of dragons.”
~ Llona Andrews, Fate’s Edge

Dragons born of a time before men

“People who deny the existence of dragons are often eaten by dragons. From within.”
~ Ursula K. Le Guin

dragon-eye-blink

“Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.”
~ Dilbert, by Scott Adams

Undulating Dragons

The Book Of Dragon

Book Of Dragon

UndulatingDragons

~~~oOo~~~

dragon enigma poem

New Facebook Page for Topaz Drachen

topazdrachendragondreamingfb1Yesterday I decided to make a new Facebook “page” which will be mainly for my Dragon-related posts, with the idea that it could possibly replace (or at least take the focus away from) my Facebook “profile”, which I might eventually shut down or at least make much more private than it currently is. Continue reading

Ouromundi Sunlight

ouromundi-5

I asked my Dragon Clan for assistance, hoping that one would come forward, but I couldn’t sense anyone in particular. So, I tried to relax and meditate on my own. My meditation eventually began, clouded with feelings of confusion and disillusionment. Continue reading

The Wisdom of Arandorn

I felt compelled to try to meditate earlier this morning so I went to my altar and asked my Dragon Clan, “Who would like to assist me?” Arandorn, the being who resides in my  Labradorite Dragon Skull, came forward. Continue reading

Serpents and Dragons in British Folklore

Laidley-Worm
The Laidley Worm of Spinlestone Haugh by Walter Crane (1845-1915)

The following article has been “reblogged” from The Atlantic Religion: A ‘Prisca Theologia’ of European Paganism.

The Atlantic Religion

It is perhaps unsurprising that Britain can lay claim to a number of ‘worm’ or ‘dragon’ legends, given its lands have been settled at various times by peoples to whom the imagery of such creatures has had deep symbolic meaning, not only to the Britons, Gauls and Irish of the Bronze and Iron Ages, but also of the ‘Romanised’ continentals and Germanic peoples who mixed with them, reinforcing and modifying the indigenous ideas of that locality. Through further contact with the East via Byzantium and the Crusades, new style and detail became added to indigenous stories which changed how people imagined these creatures looked and behaved.

The folktales and legends of old Britain were, before the 17thC era when state Protestantism began to encourage widespread literacy, transmitted orally largely in the form of either stories or ballads. Many of those in song form survive because they were published from the late 1600s onward in the form…

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Serpents and Dragons in Irish Mythology

peist-the-water-beast-of-irish-and-scottish-mythology
Péist — the water-beast of Irish and Scottish mythology. (Image from storyarchaeology.com)

The following article has been “reblogged” from The Atlantic Religion: A ‘Prisca Theologia’ of European Paganism.

The Atlantic Religion

“… No country in Europe is so associated with the Serpent as Ireland, and none has so many myths and legends connected with the same… “ Irish Druids and Old Irish Religions – James Bonwick, 1894.

Dragons and great serpents are common themes in the mythology of countries across the world, but their roles and meaning appear to differ depending upon the region concerned. In ancient Europe, serpents (the precursors of the more oriental ‘dragons’) were connected to the chthonic otherworld and underworld, and hence to ideas of decay – the earthy beginnings from which new life grows and the diseases and poisons which caused things to return to that state (i.e. – that process called ‘putrefaction’). They were linked to meres and marshes whose mass of rotting vegetation and sourness was a metaphor for death itself. That such marshy areas were filled with tiny worms, eels and wriggling creatures must have proved…

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The Role of Serpents and Dragons in Norse Mythology

Fafnir-Siegfried
Siegfried slaying Fafnir (Image from http://www.germanicmythology.com)

The following article has been “reblogged” from The Atlantic Religion: A ‘Prisca Theologia’ of European Paganism.

The Atlantic Religion

Serpents and dragons are a particular feature of northern European mythology that deserve some investigation in this blog.

The ancients viewed ‘serpents’ and ‘worms’ as a whole class of creatures – not just a ‘species’ as we in modern times would conceive it, but a morphological and philosophical grouping which included many types and forms. From earthworms, to snakes, to maggots and aquatic fly larvae, to eels and millipedes – ‘worms’, ‘wyrms’, or ‘serpents’ all occupied the same functional class. In a wider sense it could as a category include all stinging and venomous creatures such as scorpions and spiders.

The idea that disease was caused by ‘worms’ was a prevalent feature of ancient and medieval medicine: From the fungal infection known as ‘ringworm’ to the idea that worms in the teeth caused toothache, all of these were common themes in ancient Atlantic medical beliefs. During the 17th and 18th centuries, for instance…

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My “New” FAQ page

It's now just FAQs

Just over a year ago I published my contact page which had some FAQs on it which I hoped people would read before contacting me with certain questions. I also added a contact form to the page for use if not making a comment on a specific post. Previously the Home page and the Introduction page had by default become general contact pages via their comment sections so I thought this would be an improvement. Continue reading